quail hunting 2.34

Jun 2

Posted in: Quail Hunting | No Comments
Tags: florida quail hunting, Quail Hunting

Florida is a great state for quail hunting. With over 5 million acres of land for hunting all sorts of animals, quail hunting remains one of the most popular animals for sport hunting. And, because the season for hunting quail is during the months where, across most of the United States, it’s relatively cold, Florida stays warm and thus, hunting can be in a relatively calm climate.

Quail are interesting birds. They don’t migrate like other birds, meaning they’re in Florida year round. Their favorite habitat is low brush and flatlands, but they also like wooded and grassy lands, anywhere that lends itself to being able to hide. They’re not a bird that hangs in the trees, but their first response isn’t always to fly into the air to make themselves easy targets. Quail can be elusive, which makes hunting them more of a sport than duck hunting, because quail won’t respond to mating calls or any other tricks that hunters will usually employ.

Because Florida can contain many types of animals, most people will usually find a lodge of some kind that owns thousands of acres that are set aside for quail hunting. This also makes it easier for the casual hunter because there’s not only specific gear that hunters might want, but it may take having a guide and dogs specially trained in flushing out quail to not only find quail, but to be protected against dangers such as rattlesnakes, which hang out in the same kind of terrain as quail.

The strength of hunting in Florida lies in its hunting clubs and lodges. Unfortunately, the quail population has been declining since the mid 90’s, as more housing developments eat into the areas where quail like to live. Though the quail is a hearty bird, which environmentalists say will make sure they not only survive, but adapt to the changes and will flourish once more, this means that, going alone, even an experienced hunter might have to wait a long time to spot a quail.

What hunting clubs do is actually buy quails raised on farms, then release them within their property near the time hunting season begins. These hunting clubs make sure they have created the type of terrain that quail like, which keeps them from just flying off to look for other places to be. This offers new hunters a great opportunity to learn how to hunt quail, because even doing this doesn’t make it any easier for them to shoot quail. Also, these clubs make sure the grounds are fairly well maintained when it comes to having to worry about dangerous animals such as rattlesnakes and alligators, although there’s never a guarantee that one might not come upon either of those predators. And hunting clubs usually have lodges, so that the cost of hunting is all inclusive as a full vacation package plan.

Guided tours maximize the opportunities new hunters will have in at least finding quail. It takes a much sharper shooting touch to nail a quail because they’re tinier and faster than ducks. However, guides will also usually have hunting dogs trained at flushing out quail, which will give new hunters plenty of opportunities to bag a quail.

Because Florida quail hunting is so popular, lodges will quickly sell out, so it’s important to book your reservations early if you hope to get a spot. Hunting is better earlier in the season than later, since they’ve had six months to replenish the supply. If you’re looking for a new challenge, quail hunting in Florida just might bring the excitement you want.
=================
Jun 2

Posted in: Quail Hunting | No Comments
Tags: florida quail hunting, Quail Hunting, quail hunting guide

If you’re going to go quail hunting in Florida, one of the best ways to go about it is to stay at a quail hunting lodge. Quail hunting lodges are great because they can offer an all around hunting experience, equipment, lodging, food, and often at an all-inclusive rate that won’t break the bank.

The first thing you want in a quail hunting lodge is size. Hunting lodges range anywhere from 3,000 acres to 30,000 acres of land. The larger the lodge, the more apt they are to offer hunting for more than one type of prey. Also, the cost may be more, as the license fees will also be higher.

The next thing you want to know about is how they take care of the grounds. This isn’t like taking care of a golf course; the main idea is to have the grounds set up so that the quail feel like they’re getting what they need as far as food and places to protect themselves, otherwise they might fly away to other plantations, which would be a double hit on the plantation since many of them buy extra quail for the hunting season, trying to make sure hunters will have plenty of opportunities to at least have some shots at quail.

Some other things you want to find out is how they’ll take you out, what kind of guides they have, whether they have dogs, and whether they have guns you can rent and shells you can buy. Guns and shells usually aren’t included in the all-inclusive price. You are always allowed to bring your own, but if you’re in another state, you’ll want to check the laws for transporting both guns and ammunition across state lines.

Once you’ve determined where you’re going to stay, you’re going to want to prepare yourself for the experience of quail hunting. If you’re not using your own gun, it might be a good thing to find out if your lodge has a shooting range where you can practice. Most people are surprised at the recoil of rifles as opposed to pistols, and picking up some pointers on technique wouldn’t be a bad thing, since quail are hard to hit if you’re an experienced shot.

Also, make sure the clothing you select is comfortable, yet protects your skin, since there’s the possibility you’ll be out in swamps areas, which means a lot of mosquitoes and other bugs that like to bite. Definitely make sure your shoes are not only waterproof, but strong, as you never know if you’re going to walk up on one of the many types of snakes that populate Florida.

If you’re new at hunting, make sure to stay with your guide, as they’ll probably go out with groups of at least 5 to 7 hunters at a time. They will find you the best places to hunt quail, probably help you flush them out with the dogs, but their biggest asset is that they know the land and the dangers, and they will be there to keep you safe.

Quail hunting in Florida can be a very exciting experience if you take the time to learn more about where to hunt, what to wear while hunting, and, of course, how to shoot a gun.
===========
P-Arrow Plantation has been extensively managed for game and fish for 30 years. Its owners offer hunting and fishing for individuals or for corporate retreats. The P-Arrow is located in Livingston, Alabama, east of I-59 and I-20 halfway between Birmingham, Alabama and Jackson, Mississippi.

Located on the P-Arrow is over 100 acres of lakes for largemouth bass, crappie, and bream fishing. The P-Arrow is a prime location for exciting whitetail deer hunting from shooting houses overlooking green fields or tree stands.

Hunters can ride on a Belgian Mule drawn wagon carrying English Pointers and English Setters, or ride Tennessee Walking Horses to experience covey rises of fast flying bobwhites from sedge grass covered pine hills or stream side fields of partridge peas, Egyptian wheat, and corn. We have opening day dove hunts. Private dove hunts and turkey hunts are also available.

For those who simply want an outdoor experience in the old South, nature trails and historic tours are available.

Quail Hunts
There are three types of Quail Hunts which are available. They are:

The most authentic southern style quail hunt is by Belgian Mule drawn wagon. Dixon and Luke are our 1600 pound mules that pull the dog wagon. A hunt master and Hunt scout on a horse will direct each hunt. Lunch will be provided in the field by a cook.
The other type of quail hunt we provide is a full or half day hunt using the John Deere Gator with a customized box to carry the dogs and seats on top to carry the hunters. A scout on a horse will direct the hunt along with a hunt Master.
We also provide customized quail hunts to fit your desired experience.

All of the birds are either native or early released birds. There is NO LIMIT!!!

Dove Hunts
Opening Day Hunts are available. Hunters are served an excellent BBQ Lunch!!

Turkey Hunts
You will enjoy our Spring Hunts over chufa fields and wild game sorghum. We provide our turkey hunters with a personal guide.

Deer Hunts
Guided whitetail deer hunts are available. You may hunt the wary Whitetail Buck on green fields from comfortable shooting houses or tree stands. Bow hunting is encouraged!! We also offer customized hunts.

Accommodations
3 bed rooms /3 baths (1) king (1) queen (1) twin and a loft with a king and a full bed and a full bathroom. Every bedroom comes with its own private bathroom.

Fishing
P Arrow consists of eight lakes that comprise 110 acres stocked heavily with Northern, Florida and Hybrid large mouth bass. Additionally, different lakes have coppernose, bluegills, shellcrackers, and crappie. The largest lake on P-Arrow is horseshoe lake, which contains about 33 acres of water and has quite a bit of grass in it. For the angler who enjoys fishing rubber rats, rubber frogs, swimming worms and grass type baits, this lake can be very exciting. Another honey hole at P-Arrow, the brewer pond, is more than 65 years old and contains a native strain of large mouth bass. It is also home to shellcrackers blue gills. If a fly-fisherman likes to catch bass and bream this is the place for him to do that. Pruitt built coyote lake with the structure fisherman in mind. After seeing Ray Scott’s video on how to build a pond to produce big bass he adopted many of the ideas for Scott’s tape.

Available are guided largemouth bass and bream fishing trips in over 110 acres of lakes. Bass as large as 14 pounds have been caught. And, catches of as many as 50-75 fish a day are the norm for the P Arrow fishing experience.

A guide will accompany the fishing party. We will provide you with a boat and a guide for the length of your trip. Fishing for Bass are catch and release.

Testimonials
Clayton Batts – Fishing with the New Bio-Bait!

P-ARROW Plantation is truly a heaven on earth. The staff is some of the best people you will ever meet and the food is worth coming in early for. It is truly an outdoorsman’s paradise whether you come to fish or hunt; I promise that you will leave with a smile on your face. The cover is abundant from fishing trees in open water, to simply beating the banks you are guaranteed to catch fish. The fish are strong and healthy and willing to bite anything in your box. The question is not when am I going to get a bite, but how big is the fish going to be. Thanks for a great trip and hope to see yall very soon.
Thanks,

Clayton Batts
======================

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The De-evolution of a Hunter
Written on: 10/11/2009 18:28 by: Paleo
Click a star to rate this entry Average user rating: 5.0 (of 2 total)

As a kid there were two skills I mainly learned from my father, how to work and how to hunt. My father was in the army, I remember him talking once about the $800 he got a month and where it was to be used. Needless to say we didn’t have a lot but by hunting and raising a garden we ate pretty good.
Venison, quail, pheasant those are meats you might find in a swank restaurant but we also had plenty of squirrel, rabbit, dove and an occasional ground hog…hell I even ate a raccoon once. To me this was normal, to me the best meat you could buy from the grocery store were hamburgers and hotdogs because when we did buy a steak from the store it was a cheap cut, tough as shoe leather and laced with fat and gristle, which, by the way, my dad made us eat. You know…”Finish everything on your plate boy, there are starving people in India that don’t have as much as you.”
Hunting was different then, we’d jump in the truck drive out into the country, stop at a house and ask if we could hunt their property. Sometimes it was yes, sometimes it was no, but it was simple…straight forward. My dad would make friends that way and when he did our freezer was stocked for the year.
Deer hunting………………The first deer hunting experience I had was on Fort Hood. There’s a rod and gun club there and during the season they set up a lottery for soldiers/hunters. The soldiers arrive about 4:30 am for the morning hunts, 2:30 pm for the afternoon hunts, wait to see if they were drawn, the lucky ones are taken to a stand in a big army truck everyone else goes home. My dad took me one afternoon, we were drawn and I remember well the bumpy ride out to the area we were to hunt. We laid down behind a downed tree and waited for a deer to come out so my dad could shoot it. I wasn’t hunting, I was there to observe, I was six years old. It started getting cold and as it did my teeth started chattering, I couldn’t help it. My dad became really perturbed and pushed my down under a heavy green army canvass we were laying on and told me to be quiet.
The next several hours were miserable to me, etched in to my mind, I reckon for the rest of my life. We didn’t get a deer that day but as we stood in the dark waiting for the big army truck to pick us up we looked at the stars and talked, my dad wasn’t angry anymore and I heard for the first time a deer snort, “the warning there’s danger present”, he said. The ride back was just as bumpy, a truck loaded with cold soldiers in camo and a couple of dead deer.
And that was deer hunting to me for the next ten years, laying on the ground scanning a brush line, looking out across a field from the loft of a barn, aiming my rifle out of the second floor of an old dilapidated farm house, no matter where it was it always seemed to be cold.
Then things changed, my dad retired from the army, went to a community college on the GI Bill and started an AC business and for once we had a little money. He had a lease we could hunt and we built blinds with soft seats, sliding windows and even propane heaters. Part of it was because we had money but I think the other part was because my dad was getting older and just wanted to be comfortable.
The last year my dad hunted was the year I stopped hunting and didn’t hunt again for about ten years. It was the year after I graduated highschool, I bought into the lease and could hunt when I wanted for the first time. My dad bought the back end of a refrigerated truck and set it up as a meat processing areas complete with a bandsaw to cut steaks. The thing that made me stop hunting was that my father shot more than the legal limit that year. I won’t say how many more, it still embarrasses me. I became really perturbed, I wanted to push him down under a heavy green army canvass and tell him how disappointed I was in him. After that, what he had taught me about hunting meant next to nothing to me.
Time ticks on and after about ten years I started hunting again, rediscovering some of what I had lost. I rifle hunted a couple of times in Bandera with reps. from a wine company trying to smooze me. Took a couple of deer and pretty much stopped again unsatified with the same ol’ same ol’. A few more years went by and I was talked into trying bow hunting by a friend of mine. I’d played around with compound bows as a teenager and was really quite good though I’d never hunted with one, but this was traditional, the classic stick and string. So my de-evolution began, I had to relearn everything, not moving for an hour at a time, covering my scent , learning the subtle signs that tell you where to set up, making myself invisible in my surroundings.
I’ve been hunting a ranch by Lake Buchanan for almost a year now. Dozens of times I sat there and watched the day turn into night, sometimes sitting through the night to watch the sun come up again. In those times I’ve only taken four shots with my bow and with those four shots I’ve taken three hogs and a deer. All clean, ethical. All easy to track.
Last night I walked down one of the ranch roads, found a place where game traversed and sat back a little ways in the brush, a cool wind in my face, a lane in front to take a shot if presented. My bow sat three feet away leaning against a wild persimmon. As I sat there a hawk swooped between me and my bow, oblivious to my presence, the tip of it’s wing inches from my face. It flew out through my shooting lane and landed in a tree across the road from me. It perched there for a minute and then started back towards the opening. At the last moment it saw me, spread it’s wings stopping in mid air, changed directions and was gone.
I watched a group of deer feed ten yards in front of me, three does and a couple of yearlings. Two of the does were mature, one was huge. I could have taken her but I was waiting for a buck I’d seen in the area earlier this year. I watched them for about thirty minutes as they grazed and made their way off. Later I had three bucks come out, three I had seen with the buck I wanted. One was a four and a half year old eight point. Classic Hill Country rack, not real high, not real woody but symmetric. Another eight, not as big and a younger six. But the one I wanted wasn’t with them, probably split off by now in anticipation of the rut. As they moved into the brush the two smaller bucks started to tussle a bit then they were gone. The light faded and I walked back to camp in the dark, through the woods not bothering to turn on my light. Best hunt of the year, what hunting is to me.

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Comments:
Author:ggonzales Comment Left:10/12/2009 14:12
Great journal entry and so very true how we evolve as hunters, I grown an appreciation for wildlife and the habitat they live in and have passed what I learned to my son. I don’t bow hunt, but can appreciate the skill it takes to take wild game up close with a bow, good luck with your hunting and I hope that trophy buck comes out, try using some good doe scent or rattling horns, this has paid off for me.
Author:wohalliburton Comment Left:10/12/2009 18:13
After reading your post it reminded me of how precious the time you spend in the woods can be.
Hope you get that big ‘un you’re looking for.
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Fall Hunting Season
Written on: 08/11/2009 16:25 by: ggonzales
Click a star to rate this entry Average user rating: 4.33 (of 3 total)

As a true Texan born and raised I feel extremly lucky to be living in one of the best states in all of America to enjoy the great outdoors. With the coming of the new fall hunting season I am eagerly awaiting cool weather which will host classic Dove hunts early for me. I really look foward to the begining of hunting season so I can dust off that old shotgun and sight in the trusty deer rifle in preparation of a new hunting season. I like to share my outdoor experiences with others so I have recruited my brother-in-law, son and anybody else willing to put up with me on hot september afternoons to hunt Dove. I take Dove hunting very seriously and plan my outdoor outings very carefully to ensure 100% success. I like to hunt at least two weekends in September, three in October and then start deer hunting in Novemeber. This year I plan to focus most of my hunting time in the cooler months chasing after a trophy wild boar. Last year I shot a nice buck and look foward to adding a fat pig to the tall hunting stories I like to share with others.
Already we have been hitting the coast this summer chasing after the elusive redfish and sleek speckled trout to satisfy our outdoor appetite. If I can’t be out in the mesquite brush hunting then I would rather be knee deep in shallow water heaven filled with tasty game fish. Becuase of the summer heat we prefer to do our summer fishing early in the am or late in the evening. There is nothing better the getting up early at the crack of dawn to head out on the water for some early day wade fishing or relaxing in the sunset of a great evening fishing trip. This year I was fortunate enough to put some great eating fish in the freezer to fry up at the ranch when deer hunting.
I consider myself an outdoor activist and enjoy recruiting new members to our elite society of hunters and fisherman. I am blessed to have an extended family that love the outdoors and have access to family ranch land. One of these locations is a sweet piece of South Texas located near Mathis lake loaded with whitetail deer. The best part of the deal is that I don’t have to pay costly lease fees or trophy fees, it is purely a family run hunt club. All that is required is respect of the land and a promise to lend a helping hand off season to ensure the property is kept in prime condition. If this was not good enough I am also happy to say that my father is part of a historic hunt club of aluminum workers who lease a small ranch near the famous King Ranch. Good bucks have been shot at this location for many years and the place is loaded with huge wild boar. A bonus to this classic South Texas deer lease is the amazing quail and dove hunting that can be had.
I promote hunting and fishing as a way to deal with stress and life in general with a positive activity that can influence our youth to be good stewards of the land. I absolutely enjoy taking my ten year old son hunting and fishing with me on all my outdoor adventures so I can ensure that this great outdoor tradition will be passed on to others. I hope everyones outdoor adventures are plentiful and boutyful this hunting season and would like to wish all the outdoor sportsment good luck affield this year. May you catch that big fish that had been eluding your hook and may you take that nice buck that you have been dreaming about for all those years.
==========================
P-Arrow Plantation has been extensively managed for game and fish for 30 years. Its owners offer hunting and fishing for individuals or for corporate retreats. The P-Arrow is located in Livingston, Alabama, east of I-59 and I-20 halfway between Birmingham, Alabama and Jackson, Mississippi.

Located on the P-Arrow is over 100 acres of lakes for largemouth bass, crappie, and bream fishing. The P-Arrow is a prime location for exciting whitetail deer hunting from shooting houses overlooking green fields or tree stands.

Hunters can ride on a Belgian Mule drawn wagon carrying English Pointers and English Setters, or ride Tennessee Walking Horses to experience covey rises of fast flying bobwhites from sedge grass covered pine hills or stream side fields of partridge peas, Egyptian wheat, and corn. We have opening day dove hunts. Private dove hunts and turkey hunts are also available.

For those who simply want an outdoor experience in the old South, nature trails and historic tours are available.

Quail Hunts
There are three types of Quail Hunts which are available. They are:

The most authentic southern style quail hunt is by Belgian Mule drawn wagon. Dixon and Luke are our 1600 pound mules that pull the dog wagon. A hunt master and Hunt scout on a horse will direct each hunt. Lunch will be provided in the field by a cook.
The other type of quail hunt we provide is a full or half day hunt using the John Deere Gator with a customized box to carry the dogs and seats on top to carry the hunters. A scout on a horse will direct the hunt along with a hunt Master.
We also provide customized quail hunts to fit your desired experience.

All of the birds are either native or early released birds. There is NO LIMIT!!!

Dove Hunts
Opening Day Hunts are available. Hunters are served an excellent BBQ Lunch!!

Turkey Hunts
You will enjoy our Spring Hunts over chufa fields and wild game sorghum. We provide our turkey hunters with a personal guide.

Deer Hunts
Guided whitetail deer hunts are available. You may hunt the wary Whitetail Buck on green fields from comfortable shooting houses or tree stands. Bow hunting is encouraged!! We also offer customized hunts.

Accommodations
3 bed rooms /3 baths (1) king (1) queen (1) twin and a loft with a king and a full bed and a full bathroom. Every bedroom comes with its own private bathroom.

Fishing
P Arrow consists of eight lakes that comprise 110 acres stocked heavily with Northern, Florida and Hybrid large mouth bass. Additionally, different lakes have coppernose, bluegills, shellcrackers, and crappie. The largest lake on P-Arrow is horseshoe lake, which contains about 33 acres of water and has quite a bit of grass in it. For the angler who enjoys fishing rubber rats, rubber frogs, swimming worms and grass type baits, this lake can be very exciting. Another honey hole at P-Arrow, the brewer pond, is more than 65 years old and contains a native strain of large mouth bass. It is also home to shellcrackers blue gills. If a fly-fisherman likes to catch bass and bream this is the place for him to do that. Pruitt built coyote lake with the structure fisherman in mind. After seeing Ray Scott’s video on how to build a pond to produce big bass he adopted many of the ideas for Scott’s tape.

Available are guided largemouth bass and bream fishing trips in over 110 acres of lakes. Bass as large as 14 pounds have been caught. And, catches of as many as 50-75 fish a day are the norm for the P Arrow fishing experience.

A guide will accompany the fishing party. We will provide you with a boat and a guide for the length of your trip. Fishing for Bass are catch and release.

Testimonials
Clayton Batts – Fishing with the New Bio-Bait!

P-ARROW Plantation is truly a heaven on earth. The staff is some of the best people you will ever meet and the food is worth coming in early for. It is truly an outdoorsman’s paradise whether you come to fish or hunt; I promise that you will leave with a smile on your face. The cover is abundant from fishing trees in open water, to simply beating the banks you are guaranteed to catch fish. The fish are strong and healthy and willing to bite anything in your box. The question is not when am I going to get a bite, but how big is the fish going to be. Thanks for a great trip and hope to see yall very soon.
Thanks,

Clayton Batts

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