helicopter

Five Tips for Your Helicopter Flight
Posted by: admin Post date: July 29th, 2011
Here are five suggestions to make the most of your fun helicopter ride –

1) Don’t wait till the last minute. Investigate and book your helicopter tour early, especially if traveling during the busy season. What is the busy season? Gosh, that would be a good thing to find out, wouldn’t it? Ask your helicopter pilot.

2) When traveling to a new destination, fly early in your trip. You’ll get a better overview of the area, and this makes planning the rest of your time all the more fun and useful, to get the most from your adventure travel experience, or enjoy your wedding package.

3) Understand the seating arrangement beforehand. If there are two of you traveling, don’t book a helicopter with only two seats, or you’ll have to travel without the pilot! And a standard tour, in a six-seater, could mean that you’re traveling with strangers, and you might not have a window seat!

4) Eat lightly. Foods that are heavy or greasy can leave you less alert, and a big meal can leave you sleepy as well. And remember, too much food can make you feel nauseated if the helicopter tosses and turns in the air. Best: eat light snacks only.

5) Taking photos? Don’t go crazy. First take time to admire the view, then think about what you want to capture and don’t zoom too tight because aircraft movement is unpredictable. Be sure to have a window seat, and avoid wearing light-colored clothing to reduce glare from the inside of the window.

We’ve got lots more information, so if you’ve got questions, we’ve got answers!

Call us with your questions now: Helicopter Flight Information Center

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sewing dictonary – gtg

The Sewing Dictionary
A dictionary of sewing terms to help you along your sewing journey.

A

Applique – Sewing a piece of fabric atop another after folding under a small bit of the fabric to create a clean edge. When done by machine, many use a satin stitch (tight zig zag) or a buttonhole stitch if your machine has the capability. By hand, blind stitching and hand buttonhole stitches are often used.

B

Backstitch – Used at the beginning and end of a machine sewn seam to anchor the seam in place; it involves a couple of extra stitches back and forth.
Ballpoint needle – Ballpoint needles are designed to penetrate knit fabrics without nicking or damaging the fabric.
Bar tack – A group of closely sewn stitches (back and forth from side to side a la zig zag) that is used to tack a belt loop or similar item in place. This is not a basting stitch and should be repeated several times on the machine to make a very short run of satin stitching.
Baste/basting – Temporary stitching used to hold a sewing project in place and is removed when the permanent sewing is done.
Batting – Fiberfill, cotton, wool, or other material that is flattened and usually on a roll and purchased in precut lengths or by the yard. Uses of batting range from filling for placemats or vests to quilts.
Bias – Runs diagonally to the straight grain of the fabric. This is the stretchiest part on the fabric.
Bias tape – Strips of fabric cut on the bias, often turned under and pressed, and used for bindings, facings, or other application where there is a need for stretch or to accommodate curves.
Binding – (blanket, quilt, etc.) Encasing the raw edges of a blanket or quilt with another piece of fabric. Binding also refers to the fabric that is folded and used for the encasing of the raw edges.
Blanket stitch – Used to neaten the edge of a buttonhole, blanket, vest edge, or other seam line. A blanket stitch can be done by hand or machine.
Blind hem stitch – Sewing stitch that is not meant to be seen on the right side of the fabric, usually accomplished by picking up one thread of the fabric at a time rather than going through the full fabric or several threads before completing a hand stitch or machine stitch. Many sewing machines come with a blind hem attachment and the manual is the best guide for how to use it and produce virtually invisible hems.
Bobbin – The piece of your sewing machine that holds the bottom thread (the bobbin thread) and is placed in the bobbin case. It generally is under the area the needle penetrates and it loops with the needle thread to form a locked stitch.
Bodice – The part of a pattern or garment which runs from shoulder to waist.
Bolt – A large roll of fabric which can be on a tubular roll or a rectangular form. Fabric is usually folded right sides together lengthwise on a bolt.
Buckram – Strong, heavy woven fabric used for stiffening baseball cap brims and some drapery applications.
Butting – Bringing two edges together so they touch but do not overlap.
Buttonhole – A bound slit in the fabric to allow the passage of a button for closure. Buttonholes are mostly made by machine these days, but many people do still prefer to make them by hand, using a special buttonhole stitch.

C

Casing – Fabric envelope of sorts for encasing elastic, a drawstring, or similar material, usually along a waistline, cuff, hem. Elastic waist slacks have a casing into which the elastic is woven. Sweat pants have a turned up casing into through which elastic is encased (if there are not ribbed cuffs).
Clip (curve) – Methods vary from person to person, but to clip a curve keep in mind that an outside curve (shaped like an upside down U) needs to be clipped to within a breath of the seam line. An inside curve (shaped like a right side up U) can be either clipped or you can cut very small notches (V shape) out of the curve itself in order to have it lay flat and not make bunches when the project or garment is done. If you use a serger to finish your seams, clipping is not an issue.
Cording – A twisted or woven “rope” or “string” that is used primarily in piping and to act as a drawstring in a jacket hood, waistband, or as stabilizer for frog closures. Cording is covered with bias strips of fabric when used for most decorative applications (such as edging a pillow). Other decorative effects can be achieved by zig-zagging over cording on a fabric for a raised design.
Covered button – A button covered with coordinating or same fabric as the garment for which it is being made. Kits are available for this effect or creative and careful application of fabric, fabric glue and shank buttons can be used.
Cutting line On a pattern – The outermost dark line is the line upon which you cut. Traditions vary; some people cut through the center of this line, others cut just to the outside of this line.

D

Dart – A V shaped, tapered adjustment to a pattern to allow for more fullness in the bust area or less fullness in other areas (waist)
Duct Tape Double (DTD) – A body form made out of primarily duct tape and other materials that conforms exactly to one’s body because the tape is wound around the body and then removed as a whole.

E

Ease – A way of sewing a length of fabric into a bit of a smaller space without resulting in gathers or puckers.
Edgestitch – A stitch done a scant 1/8″ from the folded or seamed edge.
Embellish – Adding special stitching, appliques, charms, or other decorations to your sewing project.
Entredeux – French word meaning “between two”. Often it’s a piece of lightweight fabric joined to another piece of lightweight fabric with a delicate bit of lace. Another method is to join two ribbons with a piece of lace.

F

Facing – Fabric sewn on the raw edge of a garment piece that is turned under and serves as a finish for the edge as well.
Fat quarter – Prior a quilting term, but often used for wearable art, vests, smaller garments, a fat quarter is 1/4 yard of fabric, about 18″ x 22″ as opposed to a regular 1/4 yard, which is 9″ x 45″. Fat quarters allow quick and colorful stash building.
Feed dog – The “teeth” under the plate on the sewing machine that move fabric as it is sewn.
Finish (an edge) – Turn under 1/4″ and stitch, serge the edge, or other method of finishing the edge so it doesn’t ravel or cause a bulky problem.
Flat felled seam – A seam created by sewing fabric wrong sides together, trimming one of the seam allowances close to the seam, then turning the other seam allowance under and stitching it over the prior trimmed seam allowance. This is often used for reinforcing seams on pajamas or to reduce bulk in a seam.
Fold line – Many pattern pieces are placed on the fold of a piece of fabric. This is the actual fold of the fabric off the bolt or a fold of your own creation; the goal is to have a pattern piece that is cut out without a center seam.
Fusible (webbing, interfacing, etc.) – Has the characteristic of being able to be ironed on, usually permanently, with or without reinforcement by stitching, due to a heat-activated “glue” on one side.

G

Gather – Gathering allows for making a long piece of fabric to fit with a shorter piece of fabric and also is a method of easing a seam to allow insertion of sleeves and other rounded pattern pieces. When making an apron, there is a waistband that is the size of the person’s waist, plus some extra for tying the apron around the body. The apron itself usually is gathered, fluffy, almost pleated and has more fabric that flows from the waistband. The apron seam was gathered and then sewn to the waistline. To gather the seam, two parallel lines are sewn on the right side of the fabric, a scant 1/4″ apart. Long tails of thread are left for gathering. The bobbin threads (on the wrong side of the fabric) are held on either end of the seam and gently tugged, gathering the fabric evenly on the threads. Do not scrimp and only sew one thread of long length stitches; you will need both.
Grading (seams) – Trimming raw edges in graduate widths to reduce bulk. The narrowest seam edge should be closest to the body, as a general rule.
Grain – Direction of the fabric that runs parallel to the selvage (a stretchier grain is found running perpendicular to the selvage). Commercial patterns have an arrow on them <-----> indicating direction of the grain to assist in laying out the pattern pieces correctly.

H

Hem – Fabric that it turned up on the lower edge of a garment or sleeve to provide a finished edge. Often extra fabric is left in the hem with children’s clothing to allow for growth (especially skirts and slacks).
Hong Kong finish – Enclosing a seam with bias binding.
Hook & eye closure – A type of closure that employs a small hook on one side and a loop made of fabric or metal on the other. The hook and eye is used at the upper back of many dresses and often on lingerie.

I

Inseam Seam – inside the leg of pants that runs from the crotch to the hem.
Interfacing – Fabric used between layers of fabric to provide stabilization and form. Usually used in collars, cuffs, plackets, some waistbands and pockets, and facings.
Iron – An iron is a tool that is used to straighten or press fabric. The iron can be used with or without steam. It is a very important tool for the sewing room.
Ironing – Ironing is done by moving the iron back and forth over fabric. Ironing is generally not utilized when sewing. See “press”.

J

Jean jumper – A small piece of plastic made to ease sewing seams on denim by holding the presser foot up ever so slightly. Allows the presser foot to “jump” the seam as if it was level with the rest of the denim. Works well with all thick fabrics.

K

L

Lining – Used to finish the inside of a garment, to hide the seam construction, to allow for ease of putting a garment on or taking it off, and to provide decorative effect. A lining is cut of the same pattern pieces as the garment and often is made of “slippery” fabrics. It provides a minimal amount of warmth and usually extends the life of a garment. Linings should be washable if the garment is washable and should be pre-washed.

M

Machine embroidery – Decorative stitching created by using a regular sewing machine (zig zag, satin stitch, etc.) or a sewing machine specifically designed for machine embroidery. Combination machines are available as well.
Miter – Mitering a corner makes a smooth, tidy finish to a 90-degree corner, neatly squaring the corners while creating a diagonal seam from the point of the corner to the inside edge. Mitering is used for quilts corners, craft projects, some vests and jackets, and sometimes on collars.
Muslin – A generally inexpensive woven fabric used to make crafts, back quilts, or to make draft or trial garments.

N

Nap – Nap is the “fuzzy” part of a fabric that is usually directional in nature. Corduroy and velvet are good examples of fabric which has a nap or a pile. If smoothed with the hand in one direction, nap is typically shiny in one direction and not shiny in the other. When cutting out a pattern, care should be taken to keep fabric pieces going in the same direction nap-wise unless one is intentionally mixing naps and piles to produce a different kind of look. See “pile”.
Needle – Sewing machine needles come in a variety of sizes and types – ball point and sharps are the two major categories. Ball point is used for knits and regular sharp needles are used for non-stretch fabrics. There are also all purpose needles, but it is recommended that you use ball point or regular rather than all purpose. There are wing needles, wedge needles, needles of varying sizes and shapes, as well as twin needles for some fancier stitching.
Notch – Usually, the notch is shown on a pattern with a dark diamond. They are commonly cut outward and should be matched on seams when joining for sewing.
Notion – A term used for any item used for sewing other than the fabric and the machine.

O

Overlock – An overcast stitch to prevent raveling of fabric. There are sewing machines made to do overlock stitching. See “serger”.
Overcasting or overstiching – Stitching done over a seam to prevent raveling. This can be done by hand or machine.

P

Pattern weights – Weights used on paper patterns instead of pinning a pattern to the fabric.
Pile – See “nap”.
Pinking shears – Shears with a V shape along the cutting edge used to cut fabric and have it remain essentially ravel-free.
Pins – Pins are used for temporary basting of fabric. They are used to hold patterns in place while cutting and to hold fabrics together while stitching (it is not recommended to machine sew over pins as they have been known to break your sewing machine needle, jam the machine, or cause other problems). Often, large safety pins are used to baste quilt layers before the final quilting. Care should be taken to use a pin that will not leave a large hole and to not leave pins in fabric too long; they could cause stains or rust where they touch the fabric.
Pintuck- Narrow sewn rows of fabric that give a decorative raised look to a garment. Some bloused are made with pin tucking on the bodice for a more tailored look.
Piping – A cord covered with fabric, often used for decorative edging on garments or projects.
Pivot – To leave the needle in fabric, raise the presser foot and turn the fabric at a 45 degree angle. Then lower the presser foot and start sewing. Used to sew square seams.
Placket – A V-shaped opening at the end of a sleeve that is finished with a bias strip before the cuff is attached.
Pleat – A fold in fabric that is either inverted or folded outward, is not sewn except on the top edge (as in a skirt or slacks waistband), and provides decorative or functional fullness.
Press – Using an iron in a press/pick up/move/press/… pattern. Pressing is not moving back and forth on fabric with the iron. Pressing is done “as you go” while creating a garment.
Presser foot – The part of the sewing machine that holds the fabric in place as it is being sewn and fed through by the feed dogs. Specialty feet such as zig zag, buttonhole, cording, blind hem, and others are often included with a sewing machine upon purchase and are best learned by consulting the sewing machine manual.
Prick stitch – You use prick stitching on fabrics such as velvet where everything shows. Take a small backstitch sewn on the right side of the fabric and do the remaining backstitching on the wrong side.

Q

R

Raw (edge) – The edge of fabric that is not stitched or finished.
Right side – The right side of the fabric is the design side. There are instances of fabric with no right or wrong side visible, and the determination and appropriate markings are then made by the person doing the pattern cutting and sewing.
Rotary cutter – Early versions of the rotary cutter looked like pizza cutters. Today, the handles are often ergonomically designed and padded. The blade, though, remains a rounded razor, sometimes with pinked edging or other designs. These are great for cutting layers of fabric into straight strips. Many people are using them for curved lines and pattern cutting for garments as well.
Running stitch – A simple stitch made by running the thread over and under the fabric. This stitch is often used for basting or as the basis (marking) for another more decorative stitch.

S

Satin stitch – A very tight zig zag stitch that is available on most sewing machines. If it is not automatically available, the stitch length can be set to almost 0 to achieve a satin stitch with a plain zig zag machine.
Seam – The result when two pieces of fabric are sewn together along a line.
Seam allowance – The fabric between the edge of the fabric and the line of stitching, about 5/8″ for most patterns. (Craft patterns often allow 1/4″ seam allowance.)
Selvedge, selvage – Often marked with information from the manufacturer (color code, identifying data, etc.), this is the edge of the fabric which generally does not fray due to manufacturer’s finish. In most cases, this edge should not be included when you cut your fabric, as it may cause puckering of your seam later. on.
Separating zipper – A zipper that comes completely apart when unzipped. There is a special tab at the bottom of a separating zipper for bringing it together and starting the zip.
Serger – A type of sewing machine that stitches the seam, encases the seam with thread, and cuts off excess fabric at the same time. These are used for construction of garments with knit fabrics mostly, or to finish seams of any fabric.
Shank button – A button with space left between the button and fabric. A shank button is one made with a shank. Other buttons can be “shanked” by wrapping thread under the button to create a shank.
Sizing – Fabric finish that provides crispness without stiffness; a light starch finish.
Snips – Very small cutting tool resembling scissors used to snip threads. Usually used with hand sewing or portable projects.
Spool – The holder of thread. There are wooden spools, plastic spools, cardboard tube spools, and cone spools, as well as others.
Stash – Collection of fabric.
Stay stitch – A line of stitching just inside the intended permanent stitching line (seam line) on curved edges that stabilizes and keeps the curve from distorting. The direction of the stay stitching is shown on the pattern. If not, it generally goes from shoulder to center on necklines. There are other indications for stay stitching, but this is one of the more common.
Stitch in the ditch – Stitching in the ditch is used as a method of under stitching and also as a form of simple machine quilting for craft projects. It is a method of stitching close to a seam allowance or in the seam itself in order to hold it down.
Stitch length – In general, regular sewing is about 11-12 stitches per inch, basting/gathering/bunching/sleeve easing is about 6 stitches per inch (plus or minus 1 or 2 stitches for some applications). There are rare occasions when stitches need to exceed 12 per inch, but they are few.
Straight stitch – Stitching made with single forward stitches. This is the regular stitch that most sewing machines make and may or may not require a special presser foot.

T

Tack – A temporary stitch to hold pieces together, usually removed after final stitching. Tacking is also known as a term for starting off a seam with a few stitches back and forth for stabilizing.
Tailor’s tack – A tailor’s tack is essentially two threads in a needle, drawn through fabric layer/s and then snipped, leaving tails of thread on top and on the bottom of the fabric as a marking for later use. They can be used to mark pattern pieces for darts, buttonholes, etc. Go straight through all layers of pattern and fabric before snipping any threads. Leave a long enough tail of thread that you can find it later. Use a contrasting thread that stands out so you can see it later.
Tension- Tension is one of the least understood concepts of sewing machines. It refers to the pressure being placed on your needle and bobbin thread by your machine. There are two types of tension on your sewing machine – the thread and bobbin tensions. It is best to read your sewing machine manual for specifics. Rarely does one need to adjust bobbin tension. Your sewing machine manual will show you the appropriate settings and offer you examples of what the threads should look like on the right and wrong sides of your stitching.
Thread- A complementary or like thread is chosen for garment or project construction on a machine. The bobbin should be wound of the same type of thread or the exact same thread whenever possible, to prevent knotting, bunching, etc. The first step for most sewing machine trouble shooting is to change the thread and needle. When hand sewing with one thread, cut the end of the thread that is nearest to the spool before tying a knot in the same end. This will prevent raveling and knotting.
Top stitch – A sometimes decorative, sometimes functional stitch that is usually 1/4″ from the edge of a seam. For instance, once a vest is turned or a facing to a jacket is turned and pressed, one may stitch 1/4″ from the edge on the top of the garment to provide a bit of stabilization. This can be done in same or contrasting thread, depending on the decorative effect one wishes to achieve.
Tracing paper – A type of paper made especially to be used with a tracing wheel. It has an ink-type substance on one side for marking fabric with the wheel.
Tracing wheel A tracing wheel is used with tracing paper. The paper is placed upon the fabric with the “ink” side down, the pattern markings that need to be transferred placed upon the paper, and then the markings are traced with the wheel. The wheel itself looks a bit like a pizza cutter with spikes. Care needs to be taken not to press too hard and cut the pattern, tracing paper, or the fabric. Tracing ink from the tracing paper does not always wash out and this needs to be taken into consideration as well.
Trim – Trim is any decorative item, ribbon, lace that is put on a garment or craft item that is being sewn. Trim is also used to define the act of trimming excess seam allowances or fabric with scissors.
Tuck – See pin tuck. A method of sewing fabric together resulting in a raised seam, often seen in heirloom sewing, the bodice of a woman’s blouse or a man’s formal shirt.

U

Underlining – Lining used to add body to a garment.
Understitching – Keeps a facing or lining from rolling onto the right side of a garment. After pressing the seam allowance and facing away from the garment, stitch through both a scant 1/8″ from the seam. Some people grade the seam allowance and facing/lining prior to stitching to eliminate bulk.
Universal needle – A slightly rounded tip to use for woven or knit fabrics.

V

View – Most patterns show different variations on the pattern package. Each variation is called a “view”.

W

Warp – Threads running the length of a woven fabric, sometimes known as the lengthwise grain (little to no stretch) (see weft and grain)
Wearable art – Decorative, usually quilted, clothing made to be unique, beautiful, and functional.
Weft – Threads running at right angles to the length of a woven fabric, sometimes known as the cross grain (very little to some stretch) (see warp and grain)
Welt – A method of covering the raw edges of a pocket or other opening, can be single or double welt.
Wing needle – Needle with wide, wing shaped, flared sides used to create holes in tightly woven fabrics, such as creating entredeux. Available as single or doubles.
Wrong side – The wrong side of the fabric is the side upon which there is no design. There are instances of fabric with no wrong side visible, and the determination and appropriate markings are then made by the person doing the pattern cutting and sewing.

X, Y, Z

Zig zag – A stitch that goes one way (zig) and then the other (zag) and provides a nice finish to a seam to prevent raveling, can be a decorative addition to any garment, and can allow for give with knits. A very short to nonexistent stitch length with zig zag stitching is the same as a satin stitch.

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cleaning 2.34 good – gtg

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cleaning 1.23 good – gtg

We have been professionally cleaning commercial buildings for many years. Commercial cleaning is usually done evenings, weekends or through the night or whenever the property is empty of staff or visitors. We are able to fit in with you and complete the work whenever suits you best.

We have been fully trained in all aspects of commercial cleaning and have cleaned literally miles and miles of it over the years.

We clean commercial in offices, schools, restaurants, pubs, night clubs, hotels, guest houses, nurseries, play centers, doctors clinics/offices, dental offices, function rooms etc. In fact if you name a commercial property type, we have probably cleaned floors in at least one.

Commercial cleaning is best done when the property is empty or when as few people around as possible, this is because we use high powered equipment which can be quite noisy and to reduce slip or trip hazards. We will always put out wet floor signs and cones to warn anyone in the building that the carpets maybe damp and a possible slip risk.

Commercial cleaning differs depending on business and carpet type. You normally find hard wearing nylon carpet or carpet tiles in an office, school, play center, dental and doctors surgeries etc. Whereas you will find wool carpets in a pub or hotel. Different carpet types require different cleaning methods and chemicals.

We are able to remove most spots and stains and can also remove chewing gum without damaging the carpet. Common stains on commercial carpet are tea, coffee, fizzy drinks, ink, toner to name but a few. We have also had to remove some unusual stains from commercial carpet such as ketchup, brown sauce, curry, burger relish, chocolate and lily pollen.

For office cleaning its normally the walkways (traffic lanes) and under desks that get the dirtiest. Swirl marks from chair coasters under desks are also a common problem. These problems are normally pretty easy to rectify using correct methods, equipment and chemicals.

With pub and restaurant carpets they normally get dirty around the bar and where waiting staff go to and from the kitchen. Quite often if the carpet hasn’t been cleaned for a while the dirt and grease build up will go hard and is referred to as black top. Black top can be removed using the correct methods.

Our commercial carpet cleaning service is for the following: school carpet cleaning, office carpet cleaning, pub carpet cleaning, night club carpet cleaning, restaurant carpet cleaning, wine bar carpet cleaning, function room carpet cleaning, hotel carpet cleaning to name but a few.

For a free no-obligation quote for commercial cleaning please contact us.

We offer a professional commercial carpet cleaning service.

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Choosing The Right Type Of Carpet Cleaning

BY EXPERT CLEANING SERVICES

Do a quick online search for carpet cleaning and you’ll find a variety of different methods. The two most common are hot water extraction — mostly known as steam cleaning — and hot carbonation, often referred to as dry chemical techniques.
So how do you decide which method is best? To start, check the paperwork that came with your carpet, with the carpet manufacturer itself or with a reputable carpet cleaning company. With most carpet manufacturers the most widely accepted cleaning method is hot water extraction.
The use of truck-mounted equipment that injects water heated between 180 and 250 degrees Fahrenheit into the carpet under pressure and then rinses out a pretreated solution referred commonly as steam cleaning, helps removes embedded soiling , bacteria, dust mites and some odors. The most common drawback is a longer dry time. Done well though, the carpet should dry in just 4-6 hours, but if inferior equipment is used for steam cleaning, dry times can take more than a day — resulting in a over wetting and possibly a mildew smell — as well as the soap can be left behind, attracting more dirt.
Using technically advanced cleaning products has greatly reduced the likelihood of re-soiling that for years has been so prevalent with inferior products that left a great amount of residue behind that attracted soiling. The recent use of non residue cleaning technology has now allowed carpet to be cleaned residue free, leaving the carpet in it’s natural state as when it was new.
“The big, big difference with the advanced cleaning solution is it crystallizes as it dries, while encapsulating any remaining soiling that may have been left behind. It’s pet and family friendly and there’s no risk of leaving any type of soap residue in your carpet, which will attract dirt. If the technician used inferior products, leaving soap in the carpeting, you can tell when a customer has that happen to them. It seems like, within a week or two, the carpet seems dirtier than before they had it cleaned.”
Though most carpet types can withstand both methods, always follow the cleaning recommendations of your carpet manufacturer to ensure you don’t void the carpet’s warranty.
Some companies charge by the room, others by the foot. However a company charges, you should know what the fee will be before the technicians begin the work. Ask for a written quote if it’s not offered to you upfront. Look for a company with a good history and that carries workers compensation and liability insurance and has an affiliation with an industry trade association, like the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) or The Carpet and Rug Institute.
The most common complaint, according to the BBB or Angie’s List reports, is companies that offer a discount and then try to up-sell for additional services once they get in the door.
Customers should understand what their bill is before any work is done, “I invite customers to do as much research as they can on carpet cleaning because there are huge differences in carpet cleaning companies. It’s not just about price.” The old adage, “you get what you pay for”, truly applies. Choose your cleaning company wisely, not by their price alone.

We’ve been providing cleaning services for over 60 years. Our services include carpet, blinds, and tile cleaning. Call us for your cleaning needs.

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It’s that time of year again. The time when people tend to spend as much time outside as they do in (if not more). This means that the patio furniture on the front porch and back deck has to be impeccably clean and presentable.
If you have some patio furniture and you’d like a few ideas on how you can keep it clean during the spring and summer seasons, we have five tips that will keep your pieces looking great during the sunshine, rain and everything in between.

Plastic furniture. If your patio furniture happens to be made of classic, the main thing to keep in mind is while it may be durable, without cleaning it on a weekly basis, it can start to look a bit dingy. Usually, all you need to do is get a bucket of warm soap and water, wash the pieces down with a sponge and then rinse them off with a hose. However, if your furniture happens to be white, it’s a good idea to add a bit of bleach or hydrogen peroxide and let it sit for about 15-20 minutes before the final rinse.

Aluminum furniture. This kind of furniture can handle soap and water too. The only other thing that we suggest is that once the furniture is dry, apply a thin coat of high quality car wax in order to protect it until it’s time for you to wash it again.

Wooden furniture. Although the general concept for cleaning plastic furniture is the same for wood, one thing that we do advise is that you wear some rubber gloves (to protect your hands from possible splinters) and that you go with a kind of soap that’s specifically made to clean wood like perhaps Murphy’s Oil Soap. A denture brush is pretty effective for hard to reach crevices. Also, make sure that after you rinse the furniture that you use a soft rag to dry the furniture off.

Wicker furniture. Wicker is one of the most beautiful kinds of patio furniture, but if you try and clean it with soap and water, it can prove to be pretty frustrating. Our suggestion is that you put a small attachment on your vacuum cleaner and then vacuum the furniture to get the dirt and twigs off of it. You can then follow that up with wiping the pieces down with a damp cloth.

Upholstery, glass tabletops and patio umbrellas. When it comes to your patio furniture’s “accessories”, we have a few suggestions. For your cushions and pillows, if they are made of vinyl rather than fabric, mix a teaspoon of dishwashing detergent and Borax into a quart of warm water and put the cushions into the solution for 5-10 minutes before rinsing them off and letting them air dry. For glass tabletops, you can use regular window cleaner although if some candle wax has hardened on them, you can loosen it up by blowing warm air from your blow dryer on it for a couple of minutes and then applying some rubbing alcohol to remove any residue. For patio umbrellas, if you’ve noticed any mildew, to remove it mix 1\4 cup of bleach to a gallon of water and then wipe it down with a rag. That should do the trick.

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1.What areas do you cover?
We operate within the city and surrounding areas.

2.What kind of services do you provide?
We conduct professional carpet steam and dry cleaning; upholstery leather, steam and dry cleaning; inside and outside window cleaning; natural stone, tile and concrete floor polishing. We perform regular domestic and office cleaning, as well as one off spring cleaning and end of tenancy cleaning.

3.What is the minimum of hours for your services?
It depends on the type of the service, as different cleaning operations have different duration. We require a minimum of two hours for regular domestic and office cleaning service, a minimum of four hours for one off cleaning with your cleaning materials and a minimum of six hours for one off cleaning with our cleaning materials. The prices for end of tenancy cleaning service are fixed.

4.Are your cleaners insured?
Yes, all of our cleaners are thoroughly background checked and fully insured.

5.Can I meet my cleaner before the first clean?
We can arrange you a pre-clean meeting with your cleaner to consider whether you feel comfortable with them.

6.Will my cleaner be covered for holiday or sickness?
We always provide a replacement in case of holiday or sickness with the same standard of the service.

7.Should I be present during the cleaning?
It’s completely up to you. You could stay and supervise the cleaning, or leave the technicians work and have your time. Our cleaners could leave the key on a safe place or to an authorized person.

8.Do I have to supply the cleaning materials?
We will appreciate if you provide the basic supplies for the regular cleanings, such as a vacuum cleaner, detergents, cloths, bucket and mop. On your request we could provide everything at a small charge. For our special cleanings, such as carpet, upholstery or window cleaning, we bring the necessary equipment and detergents with us.

9.Can I change my cleaner if I am not satisfied?
Of course. Keep us informed about everything that happens during the cleaning sessions and if you have any complains, we will send you another cleaner immediately.

10.Do you have insurance cover?
We hold Public and Employers Liability Insurance, as well as Accident and Health Policy.

11.Can you give me a price over the phone?
Yes, you can discuss your property specifics and cleaning needs with our office assistants and they will provide you with a precise quotation.

12.Do you conduct cleanings during the weekend?
We work 7 days a week with no extra charge for the weekend days.

13.How can I pay for the service?
You have the opportunity to pay cash, by check or via bank transfer.

14.What carpet cleaning method do you use?
We apply steam or dry carpet cleaning, depending of the type of the fabric.

15.Is it possible the cleaning to take more than one day?
For larger amount of work we usually send a team of cleaners to finish the job within the same day. If you prefer, we could split the work and perform it for two or more days.

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